Programme Snapshots | Heroes and Villains, Subversion and Rebellion

Programme Snapshots | Heroes and Villains, Subversion and Rebellion

Can you describe your Being Human event(s) in 140 characters?

 11 events in 9 days: walks, talks, performances, lightshows, the UK’s first 24 hour street tweet of a film script & a screening of We Are Many with its director Amirani

Can you tell us a bit about the research that this relates to?

The Nottingham programme aims to be a conversation about political activism, rebellion and resistance as it has appeared in our region over time.  By enabling us to bring together a body of research that might otherwise seem remote to a regional audience the Festival will help us demonstrate the value of the Humanities to our understandings of and access to our past. This allows us to contextualise contemporary society and consider implications for our shared future.  Like all local places, Nottingham is unique and particular, but it is also international in its reach and orientations. The local, and the focus on rebellions, allows us to conduct an informed debate about the nature of societies past and present and how we should individually and collectively address local/global cultural, social, environmental, political, scientific and economic challenges.

The Festival aims to be a conversation, drawing the audience into the various themes and subthemes and making them relevant to contemporary debates on political activism, rebellion and resistance. Events will be discursive and not ‘lectures’. We will curate an ‘end of day’ (reflective) discussion group each evening in a pub or café venue, following a Café Philosophique model, to allow for an open discussion and debate on the varying interpretations of what each of the day’s events has meant for our shared and plural senses of identity, understanding of the past and our future orientations.

What will people learn or experience that they can’t encounter elsewhere?

The Nottingham programme will demonstrate the value of the Humanities and how they are crucial to how we understand and access our past and contextualise contemporary society. The Festival will also allow us to show Nottingham/Nottinghamshire’s place in the world and how its cultural impact has sent ripples across the globe.

How is this relevant to everyday life?

By enabling us to bring together a body of research that might otherwise seem remote to a regional audience the Festival will help us demonstrate the value of the humanities to our understandings of and access to our past. This allows us to contextualise contemporary society and consider implications for our shared future.  Like all local places, Nottingham is unique and particular, but it is also international in its reach and orientations. The local, and the focus on rebellions, will allow our audiences to participate in an informed debate about the nature of societies past and present and how we should individually and collectively address local/global cultural, social, environmental, political, scientific and economic challenges.

And finally, please tell us five favourite things about your location/venue.

Eastwood – D.H. Lawrence’s birthplace
Nottingham Castle – site of riots and scenes of arson and anger
Galleries of Justice – staging the Luddite trials in the court where the trials took place 200 years ago
Nottingham city – the streets where Sillitoe imagined Arthur Seaton
Broadway Media Centre and Nottingham Contemporary – where we understand the world around us through creativity

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Heroes and Villains is just one of many activities during Being Human which connects cutting edge research in the humanities to issues shaping our everyday lives. For updates on the latest Being Human news follow us on Twitter @BeingHumanFest, on Facebook, and on Pinterest. Don’t forget to sign up to our e-newsletter too!