Being Human festival returns for second year

Being Human festival returns for second year

Being Human festival returns for second year

Being Human, the UK’s only national festival of the humanities, is back for another year and is now inviting applications from across the country for public event funding. The festival will once again bring together leading academics, artists, writers, filmmakers and others for eleven days of events in November to celebrate the richness and diversity of the humanities and their place in the national culture of the UK.

The festival, now in its second year, offers a vibrant mix of discussions, performances, talks and exhibits to uncover the breadth of research in the humanities. It will run from 12 to 22 November 2015 and is led by the School of Advanced Study, University of London in partnership with the Arts & Humanities Research Council and the British Academy. In 2014, the festival involved over 50 universities and hosted more than 160 events across the country.

Academics stepped outside the classroom last year to share their work and engage with the public. From philosophers in pubs, historians in coffee houses, classicists on social media, linguists prowling town centres – Being Human demonstrated the wealth and variety of humanities research in some unusual locations. In 2015, the festival promises to take over even more venues across the country.

Grants are now available to fund creative programming which engages the public with leading humanities research, including debates, performances, virtual activities and exhibitions. All UK universities and independent research organisations are invited to apply for these small grants to participate in the festival by holding their own public events and activities to showcase humanities research.

Festival director, Professor Barry Smith of the School of Advanced Study, said: ‘After last year’s success, we’re again looking forward to highlighting the huge amount of exciting work happening in the humanities by inviting universities, galleries and museums to show their way of exploring what it means to be human.’

For further information on how to apply for funding, visit http://beinghumanfestival.org/get-involved/.

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Notes for editors:

1. For all enquiries, please contact: Maureen McTaggart, Media and Public Relations Officer, School of Advanced Study, University of London +44 (0)20 7862 8653/ Maureen.McTaggart@sas.ac.uk

2. Being Human: a festival of the humanities 12-22 November 2015

Led by the School of Advanced Study, University of London, in partnership with the Arts & Humanities Research Council and the British Academy, Being Human is a national forum for public engagement with humanities research. The festival will highlight the ways in which the humanities can inspire and enrich our everyday lives, help us to understand ourselves, our relationships with others, and the challenges we face in a changing world, and foster world-class knowledge that is vibrant, vital, and accessible to all. For more information, please visit www.beinghumanfestival.org or follow the festival on Twitter at @BeingHumanFest

3. The School of Advanced Study (SAS), University of London, is the UK’s national centre for the promotion and support of research in the humanities and celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2015. It was officially opened on 15 March 1995, by Sir Anthony Kenny as a federation of the University of London’s research institutes and, since then, has established itself as the UK’s national humanities hub, publicly funded to support and promote research in the humanities nationally and internationally. SAS and its member institutes offer unparalleled academic opportunities, facilities and stimulation across a wide range of subject areas for the benefit of the national and international scholarly community. In 2013-14, SAS: welcomed 743 research fellows and associates; held 2,081 research dissemination events; received 26.4 million visits to its digital research resources and platforms; and received 202,891 visits to its specialist libraries and collections. A series of anniversary events and activities will take place throughout 2015. Find out more at www.sas.ac.uk or follow SAS on Twitter at @SASNews.

4. The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funds world-class, independent researchers in a wide range of subjects: ancient history, modern dance, archaeology, digital content, philosophy, English literature, design, the creative and performing arts, and much more. This financial year the AHRC will spend approximately £98m to fund research and postgraduate training in collaboration with a number of partners. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK. www.ahrc.ac.uk

5. The British Academy, established by Royal Charter in 1902, is the national body that champions and supports the humanities and social sciences. It aims to inspire, recognise and support excellence and high achievement across the UK and internationally. For more information, please visit www.britishacademy.ac.uk. Follow the British Academy on Twitter: @Britac_news